Putting the BOOM into Differentiation

reprinted with permission from Minds in Bloom (first published Feb. 18, 2018)

by Belinda Givens of BVG SLP

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We’ve all been there: small group intensive instruction and every student in the group is on a different level. You have a student who is answering all the questions, eager to participate and excited about learning. Then, there is the student who gets it but doesn’t really feel confident participating because they are not quite sure of their responses. And, of course, there’s a student (or two) who is completely lost and, instead of asking for clarification, tries to defer the attention away from themselves by exhibiting distracting behaviors to interfere with others. This is the challenge that we frequently face, and our mission is to differentiate or modify our lessons in such a way that we capture and motivate every student in the group. We want to provide a level of rigor that challenges our highest scholar while still presenting the material in a manner that intrigues, motivates, and encourages our lowest level scholar to begin to connect the dots.

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From my personal experience, I have come to realize that I get the best outcomes from my students when they are having fun and actively interacting with the content. Kids today love technology, and by incorporating it into my lessons, my students come alive and get excited about learning. I strongly feel that learning should be fun in order to keep students motivated and to ultimately foster a long love of learning. When I think back to my school-age years, the teachers that I remember most are the ones who were creative and who put forth their best efforts to offer a learning environment that was full of fun and engaging resources. Fast forward to the 21st-century classroom, and it is absolutely imperative to stay on the cutting edge of technology – from digital interactive notebooks to digital self-grading task cards, there are infinite possibilities to differentiate your instruction digitally, while captivating and motivating your students.

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The discovery of Boom Cards™ has really been a game changer for me and my small group sessions. If you haven’t heard of Boom Cards yet, then trust me when I tell you that they are exploding into the world of education! My students are so eager and excited by them that they have even started to request them for homework. When we as educators can excite our students to a level that they are enthusiastic about learning, we have hit the jackpot, and that’s the way I feel when my students begin to request homework. Boom Cards are digital interactive task cards that display on SMARTboards for whole group instruction, on computers, tablets, and iPads for small group lessons, and on smartphones for independent reinforcement. I have been busy creating Boom Cards to address a wide range of language and literacy concepts in a fun and interactive way. Below is a quick peek at one of my decks:

What I really appreciate most about Boom Cards is the fact that they are presented to my students in small, digestible bites, they have visual cues built in to aid in comprehension, and they incorporate technology, which is very motivating. They also can be read aloud to students who need extra support, or you can challenge your students to demonstrate their ability to read, comprehend, and independently complete the task on each card. I also love the fact that my students receive immediate feedback, and the cards are self-grading! This saves me a tremendous amount of time with progress monitoring and allows me to easily pinpoint the areas that my students are struggling with most so I can offer increased repetitions and opportunities to master specific skills.

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Within small groups, I facilitate my Boom Cards™ lessons in such a way that every student is challenged regardless of their skill level. The interactive nature of the cards (point and click, drag and drop, and fill-in-the-blanks) naturally reinforce learning in a way that keeps my students motivated, and I spend the entire session focused on targeting important concepts and don’t have to devote time to external reward systems.  When my students are excited, it certainly shows in the area that matters most, and that is better measurable outcomes.  The increased attention level demonstrated by my students when using Boom Cards results in improved carryover from one session to the next, and therefore, we spend less time reviewing and more time on compounded growth.

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Whether you are a classroom teacher, an ESE teacher, or a Speech-Language Pathologist, we all share a common thread – we want to see growth and progress in all of our students. As a reading-endorsed Speech-Language Pathologist, my passion is language and literacy.  I make a conscious effort to incorporate literacy into every session to maximize the time I have with my students.  With the level of rigor that is expected from them in today’s classroom, I want to ensure that they thoroughly understand that what we do in our small group sessions is to better equip them with the tools they need to be successful in the classroom and beyond. For this reason, I have started a complete series of Boom Cards that target a wide variety of language and literacy concepts in each deck.  My Sequencing and Story Retell Boom Cards series is designed to address sequencing, identification of story elements, answering wh- questions, auditory comprehension, reading comprehension, vocabulary, use of context clues, and story retell. They are differentiated to encourage active participation from all students in a fun and engaging way.

To help build the foundation for strong readers, I also have several Boom Cards™ decks that address important introductory skills, including rhyming words, phonemic awareness, sight words, synonyms, antonyms, and much more!  Every deck that I create is designed with a focus on differentiation and can be used during whole group lessons, small group intensive instruction, 1:1 sessions, or independent assessment. To find more of my digital interactive lessons, please visit my Boom Learning store HERE.

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Belinda Vickers Givens, MA, CCC-SLP has been an American Speech-Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) Certified Speech-Language Pathologist for 11 years.  She is licensed in FL, CA, WA, and VT and is a member of ASHA’s Special Interest Group 18 for Telepractice.  She currently works as a teletherapist serving PreK-12th grade students.  She holds her B.S. in Psychology with a minor in Education from Florida State University and her M.A. in Communicative Sciences and Disorders from the University of Central Florida.  While pursuing her Master’s degree, she also earned an endorsement in Reading from UCF.

She is the co-owner of Infinity Rehabilitation, LLC with her husband, who is an Occupational Therapist.  She is the creator and owner of BVG SLP, which specializes in creating no-prep, no-print digital materials that are great for use in whole group, in small groups, within teletherapy platforms, or in face-to-face therapy.  She is passionate about literacy and has written a children’s book (The Adventures of DemDem the Garbage Truck: Watch Out for the Bumps).  She tries to incorporate literacy into the majority of her therapy sessions. She also sells resources in her Teachers Pay Teachers store.

Belinda is the mother to three amazing young boys and enjoys taking road trips, reading, crafting, and exploring.  She has been married for 15 years and resides with her family in Central Florida. You can keep up with Belinda at her website, on Facebook, on Instagram, and on Pinterest.

Algebraic Thinking with Boom Cards

Teaching Algebraic thinking early and often is a core feature of the Common Core math standards (and standards with similar underlying foundations such as TEKS). Algebraic thinking is the ability to recognize and analyze patterns and relationships in a mathematical context. The Common Core/TEKS approach replaces an elementary curriculum focused primarily on calculation with a model more like that used elsewhere in the world (yes Canada you beat us too it!). We still have some time in the U.S. before we’ll see the adoption of the Common Core methodology influencing high school math scores: the first cohort to have Common Core standards from Kindergarten is just now entering 5th grade.

Newer research casts significant doubt on earlier findings that students are not developmentally ready for algebra until a certain age, suggesting that those finding were are a function of instructional shortcomings, not neurological limitations. Neuroscience has shown that introducing concepts such as variable notation (representing numbers with letters or shapes) is within the reach of even lower primary-grade students.

Did you know?

When performing mathematical thinking, our brains activate the occpital lobes, the frontal cortex, and our parietal lobes. The parietal lobes help us find our way home. They combine mental maps with proprioceptive feedback to perform real world geometry and trigonometry. In the educational context, the parietal system helps us transform sequential information into quasi-spatial information, transcending order to find meaning. It is used to comprehend spoken language, perceive melody, and perform mathematical reasoning. If your students have basic navigational skills or can hold a melody, they have the baseline for algebraic thinking.

Introducing Algebraic Thinking, a pathway to success

Students begin developing algebraic thinking when they learn to decompose numbers in kindergarten. By first grade, they are ready to begin working with variable notation when solving basic addition and subtraction problems. They are also introduced to the first set of abstract rules that help them decipher relationships: the commutative and associative properties of addition. They also explore the relationships between addition and subtraction and the meaning of the equal sign. Patterns of equal groups of objects are then introduced to lay the foundation for reasoning about multiplication.

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The foundations laid with patterns of repeated addition in second grade, expand in upper elementary into manipulations with multiplication and division. The commutative, associative and identity properties of multiplication are introduced. Prior work with variable notation sets students up for success in understanding division as an unknown-factor problem. Complexity accelerates into fourth and fifth grade, adding fractions and decimals into the mix. Students use algebraic thinking to explore comparative relationships and practice writing equations using variable notation. Pattern and relationship work continues, with a focus on the patterns of factors.

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With these solid foundations, students are ready to continue developing their skills into middle school, high school and beyond, working with expressions, equation, inequalities, and when ready, working with polynomials, rational functions, and more.

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Resources for Deeper Investigation

Bárbara M. Brizuela, Maria Blanton, Katharine Sawrey, Ashley Newman-Owens & Angela Murphy Gardiner, Children’s Use of Variables and Variable Notation to Represent Their Algebraic Ideas, Mathematical Thinking and Learning, Vol. 17, Iss. 1, 2015.

Carolyn Kieran (Editor), Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking with 5-to 12-Year-Olds: The Global Evolution of an Emerging Field of Resarch and Practice, Springer International Publishing AG 2018.

Cathy Seely, A Journey in Algebraic Thinking, NCTM News Bulletin, Sept. 2004.

Teachers ❤️ Boom Cards

Today, we are sharing some of our favorite love notes you’ve sent about Boom Cards. For your shopping pleasure, this week only, the featured section of the store is all Valentine’s themed items! With only 7 school days until Valentine’s, shop now.

The Boom Team loves you back. You inspire us with your creativity. We are grateful for your feedback. Thank you for welcoming us into your hearts and your classrooms.

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Resources for DIY Digital Task Cards

Sooner or later you will make resources for your own classroom. With digital task cards you can make them low cost, reusable, and ddifferentiated. Boom Cards, unlike Google Slides, can’t be messed with by students and mistakes are super easy to fix.
Digital task cards unlock a world of color, photorealistic images, and interactivity for DIY classroom materials. Today we are going to talk about resources you can use to get started making custom Boom Cards for your classroom.

Using Boom Learning’s Content Creation Tools

We provide a variety of educational videos about creating with Boom Learning in our Create playlist on YouTube. More tips and tricks are available in our FAQs. For a TEDTalk length taste, enjoy this Studio demo by Rachel Lynette (Minds in Bloom) and Mary Oemig from our conversation with Danielle Knight (Study All Knight).

Fonts, Clip Art, Borders and Backgrounds

If you have already purchased clip art or fonts from an education seller, start by checking our Font and Clip Art Permissions List to see if the items you’ve purchased are approved for use with Boom Learning. Because the Boom Learning has built-in protections for art, there are artists who approve their resources for use with Boom Learning who disallow or require an additional license for Google Slides. Approved items may be uploaded.
If you want to skip the uploading, you can find a growing collection of clip art, static and animated, borders and backgrounds available for purchase on Boom Learning. You can find ready-made time images, fraction wheels and blocks, backgrounds and more. A little tip—bundles are found in Decks search, not in images.
Fonts are also available directly inside Boom Learning. Kimberly Geswein offers fonts at a discount for use with your Boom Cards. Try her fraction fonts to save time. We also provide a selection of free for commercial use fonts. If you have a favorite that is not present, send a request to the helpdesk. Fonts purchased from the Boom Learning store are automatically added to your Studio. They cannot be downloaded for offline use.

Photographs

If you are looking for photorealistic images to jazz up science or social study materials, consider Unsplash.com. Unsplash is an amazing resource for teachers, with a variety of stunning high-resolution images gifted to the world by photographers for commercial use. Although credit is not required, it is always appreciated and we highly recommend it. For more, check out 21 Amazing Sites with Breathtaking Free Stock Photos by Christopher Gimmer.
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Photo by Lambert Yuri on Unsplash

Free Sources on the Web

There are a number of excellent sources of free fonts, clip art, images, vintage, works of fine art and more available on the web. We highly recommend you choose resources that are free for commercial use. That way, if you decided to sell your deck, you won’t have to go back and scrub the images to remove any that were for non-commercial use only!

I Don’t Have Time for That!

You can always use the little blue Feedback button at the bottom of a deck to ask a seller to make a custom version for you. Be sure to include how the seller can contact you. You can also use Feedback to ask a seller whose style you like to create something that you need.

The Full Meal Deal

Sometimes you just need to plug a hole in a curriculum you already have or mix it up, but sometimes you want the whole deal—everything to address a standard in one place. Today we are going to introduce you to some full meals that include Boom Cards.

Primary Listening Center Unit on Aesop’s Fables

digital bundlePaisley Owl Aespo's FablesThis complete digital bundle by The Paisley Owl includes 7 of Aesop’s Fables. Each deck is a self-contained full story study. Students can choose to read the story or have it read to them using the embedded narration. When students finish listening to or reading the story, they answer a series of questions (each with its own narration). Questions evaluate understanding of characters, setting, problems, solutions, and the ability to sequence the story’s events. Listening and reading centers have never been easier.

5th Grade Volume Complete Curriculum

Screenshot 2018-01-20 14.12.18Stress-Free Teaching brings you complete 5th-grade curriculum for Volume (available at Teachers Pay Teachers). Completely paperless, it includes interactive practice pages, Boom Cards decks, and Google Forms assessments. You can use all 5 resources to teach volume or pick and choose.

To learn how to assign Boom Cards decks through Google Classroom, or any LMS, watch our video:

Secondary French Resource for verbs conjugated with avoir and étre

Mme R’s French Resources offers a complete resource to teach, reinforce and assess regular and irregular French verbs conjugated with avoir and être. This bundle, available at Teachers Pay Teachers, includes notes and exercises, exit tickets, activities, games, Boom Cards and traditional task cards, and a trip to Paris (Powerpoint) project that can be used as a final assessment. Try a Boom Cards free sample for a taste:

Boom Cards free sample

French avoir or être - passé composé
French avoir or être – passé composé

 

Find something just right for your needs today.

Give the Gift of Fundamentals: Why Sequencing is Critical

School breaks are a great time to assign optional practice on fundamentals. As Boom Cards will play on devices from smartphones to desktops, they provide an equitable method for helping students, catch up, stay up or move ahead.

Today Belinda Givens of BVG SLP talks about the fundamental skill of sequencing. Check out our store for more ideas for sequencing fundamentals.


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Sequencing: Why It’s So Critical

by Belinda Vickers Givens, MA, CCC-SLP

The ability to put things into sequential order is an extremely important precursor to organizing thoughts, retelling stories, following directions, reading comprehension, problem solving, and so much more.  It is a vital common core standard from as early as Kindergarten, primarily because it will prepare students for future academic success.  The sooner children are exposed to, and able to demonstrate mastery of sequencing, the better equipped they are for higher level critical thinking.  From putting numbers in order, alphabetizing words, recognizing a pattern, following directions, and even following a schedule, students are taught to sequence in EVERY subject.

As a Speech Language Pathologist, I work with students daily on organizing their thoughts for more effective communication.  A large part of thought organization involves being able to mentally put your ideas in order, before speaking, to effectively get your point across in a logical way that can easily be understood by your communication partner.  I find that my youngest scholars are most successful when they are presented with a visual that they are able to manipulate as they learn this vital skill.  Physically interacting with the content and moving pictures around allows them to visually see and better comprehend this concept.  As they progress towards being able to visually sequence an event or story, the goal is to graduate to fading the visual supports and ultimately independence without the need for verbal or visual cues.

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Presenting my students with picture cards for them to organize was very feasible as a face-to-face therapist, however, now that I’m working as a teletherapist (a service delivery model that allows Speech Language Pathologists to deliver therapy services remotely via the computer) gone are the days of tangible picture cards.  I love technology and embrace it with open arms as I have witnessed firsthand the enthusiasm and growth in my students when we are learning via a digital platform.  I have been very busy searching for and creating resources that capture my students’ attention to keep them engaged.

Boom Cards™ have been a HUGE hit with my students and I absolutely love the ease of use, interactive nature, and self-grading features of these digital task cards.  What I love most about them is that the cards I have created can easily be differentiated for use with all of my students regardless of their skill level.  With my lowest scholars, I can verbally provide them with increased cues or repetitions as necessary or scale back the cueing to provide less guidance as they gain independence.

 

I have started a series of Sequencing and Story Retell Boom Cards that are seasonal and timely to keep my students motivated and engaged all year long!

These cards include four complete short stories in each unit, multiple choice comprehension questions (to address story elements and answering “wh” questions), and interactive digital picture cards for students to sequence by dragging and dropping directly on the screen. I have also included visual cue cards with transition words to aid in story retell, as well as, an introduction to using context clues to address vocabulary by defining unfamiliar words.

My students have been very motivated by these lessons and are excited to manipulate the content directly on the screen.  I have found that I get the best outcomes for my students when they can interact with the material being presented.  They are not only engaged and enthused to actively participate, but they don’t require outside reinforcement to attend to the task and I can, therefore, maximize my time for increased trials.  They enjoy the ability to point and click their answer choices for immediate feedback and I really appreciate the fact that the Boom Cards are self-grading which saves me a substantial amount of time with data collection and progress monitoring.

I currently have a Fall and Winter themed unit available for purchase and will be releasing a Spring and Summer Sequencing and Story Retell unit very soon.  To find more of my digital interactive lessons, please visit my Boom Learning store HERE.


Belinda has been an American Speech-Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) Certified Speech Language Pathologist for 11 years.  She is licensed in FL, CA, WA, and VT and is a member of ASHA’s Special Interest Group 18 for Telepractice.  She currently works as a teletherapist serving PK – 12th grade students.  She holds her B.S. in Psychology with a minor in Education from Florida State University and her M.A. in Communicative Sciences and Disorders from the University of Central Florida.  She also earned an endorsement in Reading from UCF.

She is the co-owner of Infinity Rehabilitation, LLC with her husband who is an Occupational Therapist.  She is also the creator and owner of BVG SLP, which specializes in creating No- Prep, No-Print digital therapy materials that are great for use within teletherapy platforms or face to face therapy.  She is passionate about literacy and has written a children’s book (The Adventures of DemDem the Garbage Truck: Watch Out for the Bumps).  She tries to incorporate literacy into the majority of her therapy sessions. In addition to her Boom Cards store, you can find products from her at her Teachers Pay Teachers store.

Belinda is the mother to three amazing young boys and enjoys taking road trips, reading, crafting, and exploring.  She has been married for 15 years and resides with her family in Central Florida. Connect with her on Facebook and Pinterest

 

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